RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Mother of All Paint Jobs: Your House

July 17, 2017 1:00 am

If your DIY ambitions have reached epic proportion and you’re ready to take on painting your home’s exterior solo, weigh the decision carefully before proceeding. You’ll need to decide if you have the time and patience to do a detailed and thorough job. If you’re ready, willing and able, here’s how HGTV recommends going about it:

Step 1: Prep Your Surface
Priming your home’s exterior is essential to a good result. If you’re painting a new stucco home, let it cure for at least 28 days, otherwise the paint will not adhere properly. If you’re repainting an existing home, check for peeling, chipping, mildew, etc. Remove mildew by using a garden sprayer to apply a chlorine bleach solution, then use a pressure washer to remove dirt and old paint from the entire exterior.

Step 2: Caulk and Patch
Use caulk to seal any cracks and joints where one type of exterior comes up against a different type of exterior, such as window frames, door frames, molding and fascia boards. Patch chips in an older stucco surface with new stucco - allowing time for it to cure - and replace wood siding or fascia boards that show any signs of rotting. Gently sand wood trim and doors to ensure an ideal surface for painting.

Step 3: Prime
Primer is key to a good paint job as it has a high resin content that locks old paint in place and creates a healthy surface for new paint to adhere to. If you are repainting walls that have become chalky or dusty, select a chalky wall sealer. Paint will not stick to a dusty surface. When dealing with new construction, latex primer works well for vinyl and most wood siding. Check the label on your primer or sealer to determine how long to wait before you begin painting.

Step 4: Choose Quality Paint
Opt for a 100-percent acrylic latex paint for your home’s exterior. Better quality paints are usually higher in volume solids and have better binders to help hold pigments in place longer, improving the durability of your paint job. Check the manufacturer's website or ask your local distributor for a Technical Data Sheet, to determine a paint’s level of volume solids, but generally speaking, those labeled "premium" or "super-premium" are higher in volume solids than budget brands.

Step 5: Choose an Appealing Color
This may seem like an obvious step, but it’s really the most important one - not to mention potentially overwhelming - so do some research. Investigate your neighborhood to see what you like on other houses, but take into consideration the style of your home. Choose a color that complements your roofing and any brick or stone accents you may have. If you’re having trouble deciding, paint samples on your home’s exterior and study how it looks at different parts of the day. And keep in mind that vibrant colors will fade faster.

Step 6: Time to Paint
The ideal way to paint exterior walls is called spraying and back-rolling. This method requires two people, one to apply paint with a sprayer, another to follow behind with a roller. This delivers an even finish, particularly on textured surfaces like stucco. If your budget allows, apply a second coat after the recommended dry time. Muted colors cover better than bright ones, which may require a second coat to get the full color.

Step 7: The Details
The last step is to paint the doors, fascia, molding, shutters and other decorative details. Use a good brush or 6-inch "hot dog" rollers.

Remember, there are no short cuts, so be prepared to invest the necessary time. And it will be worth it - a quality paint job can last 10 years in the right climate.

Source: HGTV.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tips for Summer Eye Safety

July 17, 2017 1:00 am

This summer, don’t let your eyes sizzle behind a pair of cheap sunglasses. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, when our eyes are exposed to strong sunlight without proper protection, UV rays can burn the cornea and even cause temporary blindness. Long-term sun exposure is linked to more serious eye disease, such as cataracts, eye cancer and growths on or near the eye. A lifetime of exposure also likely increases progression of age-related macular degeneration, a condition that can cause blindness.
Below are a handful of eye safety tips from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Shop right. When shopping for sunglasses, look for a tag or label that says 100 percent protection against both UVA and UVB or 100 percent protection against UV 400. UV protection is the essential piece you need to look for in a pair of sunglasses. Darkness and color do not indicate the strength of UV protection, and neither does the price tag. Even the least expensive sunglasses can offer adequate protection.

Double check if needed. If you doubt your sunglasses have the UV protection claimed by a retail tag, take them to an optical shop. Any shop that has a UV light meter can test your sunglasses. A UV light meter is a handy test for when you doubt your sunglasses have the UV protection claimed by a retail tag or if they are simply old and you want to make sure.

Add a hat. In addition to shades, consider wearing a hat with broad brim. They have been shown to significantly cut exposure to harmful rays.

Check your child. If you’re a parent, make sure your child’s eyes are properly protected. "It's so important for children to wear UV-blocking sunglasses early in life. It's the cumulative damage that occurs over time that puts you at risk of developing sight-robbing eye disease," says Jeff Pettey, M.D., a clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. "And it's never too late to pick up the habit. Start protecting your eyes today."

Source: the American Academy of Ophthalmology

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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