RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Four Better Ways to Cut Home Insurance Costs

December 3, 2014 12:03 am

While there are many smart ways to save money on homeowners insurance, there are also mistakes that can result in a highly detrimental lack of coverage.

“Asking about available discounts and comparison shopping is an excellent way to cut insurance costs,” says Jeanne M. Salvatore, senior vice president and chief communications officer of the Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.). “However, consumers who try to save money by reducing or dropping necessary coverage could be left dangerously underinsured.”

Following are the five biggest home insurance mistakes consumers can make, along with suggestions for better ways to save money:

1. Selecting an insurance company by price alone. It is important to choose a company with competitive prices, but also one that is financially sound and provides good customer service.

A better way to save: Check the financial health of a company with independent rating agencies and ask friends and family for recommendations. You should select an insurance company that will respond to your needs and handle claims fairly and efficiently.

2. Insuring a home for its real estate value rather than for the cost of rebuilding. When real estate prices go down, some homeowners may think they can reduce the amount of insurance on their home. But insurance is designed to cover the cost of rebuilding, not the sales price of the house. You should make sure that you have enough coverage to completely rebuild your home and replace your belongings.

A better way to save: Raise your deductible. An increase from $500 to $1,000 could save up to 25 percent on your premium payments.

3. Dropping flood insurance. Many homeowners are unaware they are at risk for flooding, but in fact, 25 percent of all flood losses occur in low risk areas—and damage from flooding is not covered under standard homeowners and renters insurance policies. Coverage is available from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), as well as from some private insurance companies. Keep in mind that significant snow fall in winter may cause spring related flooding to be particularly severe.

A better way to save: Before purchasing a home, check with the NFIP to determine whether the property is situated in a flood zone; if so, consider a less risky area. If you are already living in a designated flood zone, consider mitigation steps that can reduce your risk of flood damage.

4. Neglecting to buy renters insurance.
A renters insurance policy covers your possessions and additional living expenses if you have to move out due to an insured disaster, such as a fire or hurricane. Equally important, it provides liability protection in the event someone is injured in your home and decides to sue.

A better way to save: Look into multi-policy discounts. Buying several policies with the same insurer, such as renters, auto and life will generally provide savings.

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

5 Tips to Prevent Winter Dehydration

December 2, 2014 12:41 am

(Family Features) When the mercury drops, it's more important than ever to stay properly hydrated. During the winter, people may not seem to sweat as much as in the summer, but that doesn't lessen one's risk of dehydration.

"As a hospital physician, I've seen far too many people succumb to dehydration-related health scares, stemming from high-elevation ski trips to travel to simply forgetting to drink water because it's cold outside," says Dr. Ralph E. Holsworth, director of clinical and scientific research for Essentia Water and medical physician at Southeast Colorado Hospital. "Staying properly hydrated can help ensure good health through the winter, reduce dry skin and even help you flush toxins out of your body to reduce the chances of getting a winter cold or flu."

Roughly 75 percent of the North American population is chronically dehydrated. By the time you feel thirsty (and sometimes when you don't) you may already be dehydrated. Whether you're skiing or just taking a walk on a brisk day, experts recommend these tips to stay hydrated throughout the winter season and beyond.
  • Set a daily water intake goal. A good rule of thumb for daily water intake from food and fluids is 2 liters for females and 2.5 liters for males with moderate physical activity levels. Adjust your personal goal to account for climate and activity level. Start your day by filling a tumbler or setting out bottles of your favorite water totaling your goal. Supplement with healthy foods that have high water content like soup, salad and pears.
  • Winter it up. During cooler weather, chilled water isn't very enticing. To make it more appealing, warm a mug of water or add a burst of flavor from your favorite winter fruit like oranges, tangerines or cranberries. Drop in a cinnamon stick for an added flavor kick and enticing aroma.
  • Check the mirror. A tried and true way to know if you're getting enough water is to check your mirror. If your skin appears dry and flaky, it's time to drink more fluids.
  • Drink electrolyte-enhanced alkaline water (also called functional water). Wellness experts agree that disease and infection have a hard time thriving in an alkaline environment. High-pH water can help neutralize acid levels and restore your body to a natural state. Functional water can help you avoid or fight winter colds and flu, hydrate your skin and re-hydrate someone who is showing signs of dehydration.
  • Pack the H2O. From carrying a backpack to wearing a special hydration pack, it's important to bring water with you during winter outings. If you simply can't bring it with you, be sure you have a list of stores that offer bottled water, and keep a supply of it in your car's trunk for emergencies.
Source: Essentia Water

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: