RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Prepare for Power Outages with a Checklist

September 3, 2014 2:30 am

Americans who have recently endured a prolonged power outage at home are much more likely to improve their family's emergency preparation for the future, according to a recent report.

A 2014 survey conducted by Harris Poll found almost one in four U.S. adults had endured a power outage lasting 12 hours or more in the last two years. That experience motivated two-thirds of respondents to be more prepared for future incidents, according to the survey.

"The high percentage of respondents who took action to better prepare their families and homes for future emergency situations really underscores the level of frustration a power outage can cause families who aren't properly prepared," said Amanda Grandy of Briggs & Stratton, commissioners of the survey.

When you have advance warning of a potential loss of power, which is often caused by a strong weather system, there are many steps families can take to minimize the stress it can cause. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends that you create an emergency preparedness plan with a checklist of items:
  • Make sure your gas tank is full
  • Fill plastic bags with water and place them in the freezer
  • Stop by the bank to ensure you have some cash on hand
  • Fill prescriptions that are approaching their refill date
Disasters, however, don't always come with prior notice, so having an emergency kit prepared ahead of time is the surest way to protect your family. Be sure to include items such as:
  • A three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Adequate water (a gallon per person, per day)
  • First aid supplies
  • Matches
  • Battery-powered radio
  • Flashlights
  • Extra batteries
  • Essential toiletry items, such as toothbrush and paste
An expanded list of items to consider when packing your emergency supply kit can be found at www.fema.gov.

Source: Briggs & Stratton

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Mixing Patterns: The Rule of Threes

September 3, 2014 2:30 am

Pattern and texture are essential to interior design. Whether on a fabulous set of nature-inspired pillows or a chunky knit throw blanket, the right mix of patterns and textures creates symmetry and visual interest. Incorporating pattern can be especially intimidating to homeowners who fear the end result will be a room full of mismatched pieces.

To prevent your space from pattern overload, stick to the rule of threes. Aside from balancing a room, combining patterns in threes lends a designer’s touch of sophistication.

1. Choose a dominant pattern. This is typically a large-scale print found on wallpapers, rugs, sofas or other big pieces of upholstered furniture.

2. Add a secondary pattern. Think about outfitting smaller surface areas, such as drapes and side chairs, with a pattern that color-coordinates with your dominant choice.

3. Use a third pattern sparingly. This pattern applies to accents, such as pillows, table linens, lamp shades, and ottomans that can be swapped out in a snap. Reserve on-trend patterns for these accessories.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: