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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Take Care when Handling Contact Lenses

October 10, 2014 1:32 am

Per the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), all contact lenses are classified as medical devices and require a valid prescription. The American Optometric Association (AOA) supports this assertion, stressing the importance of acquiring lenses only with a valid prescription from an eye doctor.

"Contact lenses are among the safest forms of vision correction when used properly," says Thomas Quinn, O.D., AOA Contact Lens and Cornea Section chair. "A medical eye and vision examination from your optometrist can determine if you are a good candidate for wearing contact lenses, regardless of whether they provide vision correction or not. During the exam, your eye doctor will make sure your lenses fit properly and teach you how to safely care for your lenses."

AOA eye doctors point to six common mistakes made by patients when it comes to handling contact lenses, including:

1. Not washing and drying hands.
Washing your hands may seem like common sense, but an AOA American Eye-Q® survey found that 35 percent of contact lens wearers skipped this important step. Drying is also an important part of the process since tap water can contain harmful microorganisms that can be transferred onto the lens and onto the eye.

2. Wearing lenses longer than recommended. Many contact lens wearers will try to make their lenses last longer by waiting to change them until the lenses become bothersome. Not following an eye doctor's recommended changing schedule can cause preventable eye irritation or even lead to permanent eye damage from bacterial infections.

3. Not replacing contact lens cases regularly. Eye doctors advise that lens cases be replaced at least every three months, and cases should be cleaned and disinfected periodically in between.

4. Sleeping in contacts overnight. Sleeping in contacts puts consumers at risk for an eye infection. Only do so when wearing lenses specifically designed for day and night wear and when closely monitored by your doctor.

5. Reusing old contact lens solution. Only fresh solution should be used to clean and store contact lenses. Stick to products recommended by your eye doctor to clean and disinfect lenses, and remember, saline solution and rewetting drops are not designed to disinfect lenses.

6. Wearing contact lenses while swimming or in a hot tub. According to the FDA and the AOA, contact lenses should not be exposed to any kind of water, including tap water and water in swimming pools, oceans, lakes, hot tubs and showers.

Source: AOA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Is Your Home Prepared for a Wild Winter?

October 10, 2014 1:32 am

The 2015 Farmers’ Almanac predicts “copious amounts of snow and rain” over the eastern third of the country. In fact, along the Atlantic Seaboard, active wintry weather is expected for the first 10 days of January and the first week of February with bouts of heavy snow and strong winds. With a relatively mild autumn in many parts of the country, now is a good time to take steps to winter-proof your home and make sure that you have the right type and amount of insurance.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, water damage and freezing account for almost 22 percent of all homeowners insurance claims, averaging $4,024 per claim. In fact, winter storms are the third-largest cause of catastrophe losses, causing $1.9 billion in insured losses in 2013, according to Munich Re.

Standard homeowners and renters policies cover winter-related disasters such as burst pipes, ice dams and wind damage caused by weight of ice or snow, as well as fire-related losses. Coverage for flooding is available from the National Flood Insurance Program and from some private insurance companies.

Flooding related to snow melting can overburden sewer systems, causing raw sewage to back up into the drains in your home. Backed up sewers can wreak havoc, causing thousands of dollars in damage to floors, walls, furniture and electrical systems. Sewer back-up is not covered under a typical homeowners or renters insurance policy, nor is it covered by flood insurance. This type of coverage must be purchased either as a separate product or as an endorsement.

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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