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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Run Your Home More Like a CEO

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

All successful CEOs have one thing in common: They’re able to maintain a big-picture perspective. It’s also something successful moms have in common, says Zenovia Andrews, a business strategist, speaker, author and mom who coaches entrepreneurs and CEOs on time and budget management.

“In business, CEOs implement a process that achieves efficient time and resource management in the most cost-effective way; sounds a lot like a mom, doesn’t it?” says Andrews, founder and CEO of The MaxOut Group, a company devoted to empowering and teaching entrepreneurs development strategies to increase profits.

“If every mom were a CEO, America would rule the world!”

Andrews, author of the new book “All Systems Go – A Solid Blueprint to Build Business and Maximize Cash Flow,” (www.zenoviaandrews.com), suggests the following tips for moms to better manage money and time.

CEOs utilize apps, and so should CEO Moms. When a CEO’s personal assistant isn’t around or, if it’s a small business and she doesn’t have one, then apps do nicely. There are several apps for moms, including Bank of Mom – an easy way to keep track of your kids' allowances. Set up an account for each child and track any money they earn for chores or allowance. The app also allows you to track their computer and TV time as well as other activities.

Measurement is the key to knowledge, control and improvement. CEOs have goals for their businesses and Moms have goals for their family members. In either case, the best way to achieve a big-picture goal is to identify action steps and objectives and a system for measuring progress. Want to improve your kids’ test scores, help your husband lose weight or – gasp – free some time for yourself? There are four phases to help track progress: planning, or establishing goals; collection, or conducting research on your current process; analysis – comparing information from existing processes with the new one; and adapting, or implementing the new process.

Understand your home’s “workforce.” A good CEO helps her employees grow and develop, not only for the company’s benefit, but for the employee’s as well. Most people are happiest when they feel they’re learning and growing, working toward a goal, which may be promotion within the company or something beyond it. When they feel the CEO is helping with that, they’re happier, more productive, more loyal employees. Likewise, CEO Moms need to help their children gain the skills and knowledge they need not only to succeed in general but to achieve their individual dreams.

A well-running household is a community effort; consider “automated” systems. In business, automated systems tend to be as clinical as they sound, typically involving technology. Yet, there’s also a human resource element. Automated systems are a must for CEO Moms, and they tend to take the form of scheduling at home. Whose night is it for the dishes, or trash? One child may be helpful in the kitchen, whereas another may be better at cleaning the pool.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Majority of Americans in the Driver's Seat When Buying a Vehicle

September 8, 2014 1:24 am

The majority of Americans demand explicit control during the car shopping process, opting to use independent automotive research sites and experience-based activities, such as visiting a dealership and talking with friends, rather than traditional advertising channels, to navigate the process of buying a car. According to a recent study by C+R Research, car shoppers rely only on a handful of trustworthy resources when researching and purchasing a vehicle.

"Consumers can be overwhelmed by automotive content, but rather than tune it all out, they're selecting the pieces that are most valuable to them, effectively curating their own car buying experience," said Simon Tiffen, senior manager of advertiser insights at Cars.com. "They're willing to put the time in to gather all the information they need so that they're confident when they eventually head to the dealership."

From TV and radio advertisements to independent research sites and offline conversations, consumers are inundated with auto-related messages throughout the car shopping process; however, the majority of consumers report using only one or two sources to make a decision. These "go-to" sources are typically viewed as the most helpful and trustworthy by consumers.

Additionally, offline experiences, not offline advertisements, impact consumers. The most influential offline information sources are experience-based and include talking to friends, visiting a dealership and noticing a vehicle on the street.

More importantly, online research has become a substitute for dealership contact. Only half of all car shoppers reported contacting a dealership prior to visiting, with most citing that they felt it was unnecessary given the information available online.

Knowing when to leverage each source is equally important. The study found that online sources are more influential earlier in the shopping process, while offline sources, such as visiting a dealership, become more important once primary online research has been conducted.

Source: Cars.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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