RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Get More Out of Household Items with Double-Duty Tips

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

From removing stains to shining shoes, you can do more than think with common household items. Here are a dozen ideas from Good Housekeeping Magazine just to get you started:
  • Mayo for water rings – Water rings on the table? Dab on mayonnaise (not the lite kind), let sit for a few hours and wipe away the mayo and the water ring.
  • Eyeglass case – When packing for your next vacation, use a spare eyeglass case for safely stowing jewelry, ear buds, chargers or other small items.
  • Kitchen tongs – Use them to help you grab something from a high closet shelf or something that fell behind the washer or dryer.
  • Liquid laundry pre-treater – Use it to loosen labels on washable hard surfaces or that annoying adhesive left by price stickers.
  • Emery boards – Use them to gently buff away stains on your suede handbags or shoes.
  • Table spoon – After chopping onions or garlic, neutralize your smelly hands by rubbing them on a stainless steel spoon under running water.
  • Kneadable art eraser – It does a fine job of removing scuffmarks from tile or wooden floors.
  • Drinking straws – Making a bouquet or floral centerpiece? Firm up the stems of tulips, daffodils and other flowers by inserting each stem into a drinking straw before adding it to a vase or bowl. Cut straws to size if you need to.
  • Newspaper – Spiff up dark colored shoes in a pinch by rubbing them with a balled-up sheet of black and white newspaper. (No polish needed.)
  • Cooking spray – Spritz a little on a squeaky door hinge, then swing the door back and forth a few times until the squeaking stops.
  • Rubber gloves – Grab one from under the sink and use to help you open a tight or stuck jar lid.
  • Kitchen colander – The old pasta drainer provides a wring-proof way to get the water out of hand-washed delicates. Push the water out, let drip for a bit and lay flat to dry.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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First Aid Basics Every Kid Should Know

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

Kids love summer. They have more time for fun with friends and, in many cases, more freedom to explore their surroundings without adult supervision. But accidents happen, and kids old enough to play outdoors should know some first aid basics.

Before your children run out into the great summer outdoors, consider arming them with a cell phone so they can call home or 911 in an emergency - and be sure they are familiar with these first aid tips for common childhood injuries:

Nosebleed – Have the person sit up straight and lean forward slightly. (Don’t tilt the head backward.) With thumb and index finger, firmly pinch the nose just below the bone up against the face. Apply pressure for five minutes. If bleeding continues, repeat the process.

Bee or wasp sting – If the person has a history of severe reaction to stings – or if they have trouble breathing, feel faint or dizzy, or have a swollen tongue – call 911 immediately. Otherwise, scrape the area with a fingernail and try to remove the stinger. Elevate the affected arm or leg and apply something cold if available. Unless the pain, dizziness or other symptoms dramatically lessen, get the person home as soon as possible.

Sprain – It may not be easy to know at once if the injury is a sprain or a broken bone. Have the injured person rest for a few minutes, apply ice if available, then compress the injury by wrapping the arm or leg not too tightly in a towel or a rolled up shirt. If the person can walk or limp, take him or her home. If not, call parents or 911. The injury should be seen by a doctor as soon as possible to determine if there is a break.

Severe sunburn – If the burned skin begins to blister, it’s a sign of serious sunburn. Rehydrate the victim with water, juice or sports drink. Soothe the burn by bathing with lukewarm water or applying cool compresses. Apply aloe or moisturizing lotion, keep the person out of the sun, and get him or her home to rest.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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