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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Surviving Hurricane Season: Prep for Older Americans

September 11, 2014 1:09 am

Hurricane season is upon us, and just two years after Sandy, AARP is reminding older residents, their families and friends to get ready early this hurricane season. While Sandy claimed victims as young as toddlers, it was crueler to the city's elderly, with 27 New Yorkers aged 65 or older perishing in the storm.

For older individuals who often times have limited mobility, delayed reaction, and reliance on prescriptions for their health, prepping in advance for extreme weather can mean the difference between life and death.

That's why AARP is now offering key tips on how you can ensure the safety of elderly loved ones in the wake of disaster.

"Don't wait for the threat of a storm to start thinking about getting prepared. When power goes out, the elevator goes out, and many elderly are unable to make it down a flight of stairs in the dark to go grocery shopping for needed items, and when they run out of a prescription, it can become life threatening," said Beth Finkel, State Director for AARP in New York. "The simple act of checking in on the elderly can go a long way to helping them stay safe in times of a disaster such as Sandy, and in some instances may even save a life."

Before the first big storm of summer hits, AARP offers the following tips and resources for older residents:
  • Check on Rx supplies: If they are running low, most pharmacies will provide a three-day supply (bring verification of prescription, such as bottle or script from doctor, if available). To find out a pharmacy's status, check here: http://www.rxopen.org.
  • Groceries: Offer to assist with any grocery shopping. Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.
  • Meals: If the individual in need of meals is at least 60 years old, Meals on Wheels can be contacted here: http://www.mowaa.org/findameal.
  • Medical Emergency: Call 911. Medicare patients in New York can also now receive non-emergency care at a nursing home without a prior three-day hospital stay.
  • Personal Care Assistance: If an elderly loved one receives assistance from a home healthcare agency, find out how they respond to an emergency. Designate backup or alternative providers that you can contact in an emergency.
  • Assist with Home Preparations: Bring inside loose, lightweight objects such as lawn furniture and garbage cans, anchor objects that will be unsafe to bring inside, like gas grills or propane tanks, close windows and outside doors securely and move valuable items to the upper floors.
  • Update your Evacuation Kit: Your Evacuation kit should include an ID or Driver's License, birth certificate; clothes, food and water (for at least three days); cash and traveler's checks; maps of the evacuation route, alternate routes and a way to get to local shelters; and your car keys along with a full tank of gas.
  • Have a Supply Kit ready: Your Supply kit should include a flashlight, first aid kit, batteries, food, water and any medications you may need for at least three days.
  • Plan for Pets: If a hurricane requires you to leave your home and you cannot shelter pets at a kennel or with friends or relatives outside the evacuation area, pets are allowed at all city evacuation centers.
Source: AARP

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Moving Out of State? 3 Estate-Planning Consequences to Consider

September 10, 2014 2:36 am

Moving to another state can be a stressful process. The last thing you want is to add the headache of estate law problems to your growing list of worries. But America is constantly moving. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that almost 36 million U.S. residents moved between 2012 and 2013.

Give yourself a moment, put down the boxes, and read about three estate consequences of an out-of-state move that you may not have considered:

1. State Rules about Out-of-State Executors

With your family and your old life back in your old state, it's pretty likely that your estate executors are out-of-state executors, which might be a problem.

Some states, like Ohio, require that out-of-state executors be related by blood or marriage to the estate holder, or at least reside in a state where non-relations can be named as executors. Your chosen executor may also need to travel to the state where you have died in order to administer your estate, so it may be necessary to keep travel ability in mind.

Other states, like New York, may also make it difficult for an out-of-state executor to take your property back to his or her home state. Before you move, you'll want to check the executor rules in both your current and future home states (or ask an estate planning attorney).

2. Moving Into (or Out of) a Community Property State


Some of the most populous states in the country are community property states, and whether you're moving into one or moving away from one, you need to consider the effect on your estate plan. A married couple who moves from Texas to New York may be unaware of how much the difference in inheritance and marital property laws will affect the final distribution of property.

This can be even further complicated if the married couple is same-sex and moving to a state which does not recognize the union as legal.

3. Different Rules About Living Wills/Advance Medical Directives

Living wills, also known as advance medical directives or advance health directives, are creatures of state law. Why risk having your wishes relating to life support hang on a technicality between state laws? For example, if you're a woman, you may wish to know if your new state will allow life support to be removed in the event you are pregnant.

An experienced estate planning attorney in either your old or new state should be able to clear up these and other estate consequences of moving to another state.

Source: FindLaw.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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